Post-Election Day

This comes from

, and brings to mind a poll I’d like to take:
How many of my LJ readers voted yesterday?
My hypothesis is that a higher than the average percentage of you did, but I’m curious to know how much higher. 

“ONLY ABOUT 13% OF ELIGIBLE VOTERS IN THE CITY OF BOSTON TURNED OUT. This is appalling. Moreover, it’s embarrassing. It’s no secret that we are a country of riches. As a country, we consume far more than our fair share of the earth’s resources, we have so many things that other countries do not. And I concede that no one here wants to give up electricity, running water or our out of control petroleum usage. Fine. But fer chrissakes people — there are still people in this world who do not have the right to vote. How absolutely disgusting that eligible voters here treat this right, this civic duty, so casually. So non-chalantly.

How you take something that like that with so little care? How can you have a right that people are dying for (or being murdered over) and say, “oh I don’t feel like it?” I am boggled.

There are a couple of close races that I was watching closely that were decided by a handful of voters.

Do you STILL really think your vote doesn’t matter? Or that it doesn’t count? If you did vote, you are exempt from the guilting that follows!

In Brockton, a black, gay, married man very nearly beat out an entrenched incumbent who had as recently as April, supported a coal power plant in the city that very few of the city residents wanted. Jass Stewart lost to Jim Harrington by 5% What would have happened if just a few more people turned out? How do you feel now about the fact that you didn’t vote?

In Somerville, Tony LaFuente missed becoming an alderman by 21 votes. He is asking for a recount but wow, 21 votes. What would have happened if just a few more people turned out? How do you feel now about the fact that you didn’t vote?

In Quincy, a wonderfully progressive mayor lost to someone promising to bring back the “good old days,” who also signed the anti-marriage petition. Mayor William Phelan lost his election to Thomas Koch by 11% — how many people didn’t vote because they thought Phelan was an “easy win” since he was the incumbent? What would have happened if just a few more people turned out? How do you feel now about the fact that you didn’t vote?

Felix Arroyo, easily Boston City Council’s most progressive councilor as well as being a key link to Boston’s Latino communities, LOST his seat something that no one predicted would or could happen. What would have happened if just a few more people turned out? How do you feel now about the fact that you didn’t vote?

I’m also really effing tired of hearing “I don’t know enough about the candidates to vote, I’m not educated on the candidates” or my personal favorite, “I don’t want to just vote for anyone.” WHY THE HELL NOT?!? Think about how many things you do every day without being fully informed or educated. Do you try EVERY flavor of coffee at the coffee shop before buying a cup? No. You pick something based on your best instinct and see how it works out. Obviously it’s better to have an idea of the candidate that best represents you but not knowing is no excuse to not vote.

In fact, if you’ve been around me long enough you’d know that I don’t think there is EVER an excuse to not vote. Ok, well, if for some reason you are in some horrible accident on election day and taken to the ER, or if you died, I suppose those would be acceptable excuses.

Thanks to the wonder of absentee ballots there is almost no good reason to not vote. Not having thought ahead of time to send away for an absentee ballot doesn’t count. I’ll let it go this ONCE but next time, VOTE. Ok?”

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~ by realsupergirl on November 7, 2007.

5 Responses to “Post-Election Day”

  1. I haven’t seen the Oregon turnout numbers for yesterday but I am totally sold on the 100% vote by mail thing.

  2. I always lost my mail ballot. I really missed the polls.

  3. I don’t miss the polls at all. I always found it stressful trying to get to the polls before they closed. I also had a sort of case of test anxiety in the polling booth and hated going in there (weird, since I’ve *never* had test anxiety in school). With a mail-in ballot, I feel I have more time to read it over and vote thoughtfully when doing it at my kitchen table. In addition, I can have my laptop there to look stuff up. It just seems to me to be so much more relaxed and pressure-free this way.

    It totally bypasses the whole electronic voting machine/hanging chads/butterfly ballot issue, too. Need a paper trail? Hey, there’s this huge stack of ballots sitting here … isn’t that convenient? As an IT professional I feel a *whole* lot better that with vote-by-mail the machines tabulating the votes are not physically accessible to the general public, unlike the proven-insecure electronic voting machines in other states’ polling places. Rule #1 of IT security (paraphrased) – the only secure computer is the one locked in a closet. While the machines in Oregon aren’t exactly locked in a closet, at least access to them is limited only to the county employees who are actually counting the votes.

    The minute they offered permanent absentee registration, I leapt at it and never looked back.

  4. I don’t miss the polls at all. I always found it stressful trying to get to the polls before they closed. I also had a sort of case of test anxiety in the polling booth and hated going in there (weird, since I’ve *never* had test anxiety in school). With a mail-in ballot, I feel I have more time to read it over and vote thoughtfully when doing it at my kitchen table. In addition, I can have my laptop there to look stuff up. It just seems to me to be so much more relaxed and pressure-free this way.

    It totally bypasses the whole electronic voting machine/hanging chads/butterfly ballot issue, too. Need a paper trail? Hey, there’s this huge stack of ballots sitting here … isn’t that convenient? As an IT professional I feel a *whole* lot better that with vote-by-mail the machines tabulating the votes are not physically accessible to the general public, unlike the proven-insecure electronic voting machines in other states’ polling places. Rule #1 of IT security (paraphrased) – the only secure computer is the one locked in a closet. While the machines in Oregon aren’t exactly locked in a closet, at least access to them is limited only to the county employees who are actually counting the votes.

    The minute they offered permanent absentee registration, I leapt at it and never looked back.

  5. and I feel fine…

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