Scrabble has no ethics

I just realized that yesterday I played the word “jew” in Scrabulous, because it scored me 46 points. But the only reason it is an acceptable Scrabble word (and it isn’t in OSPD, but it is in SOWPODS) is because of its usage as a verb, which is horribly anti-Semitic in nature.

Now I am really, really disturbed with myself. Apparently my sense of ethics goes out the door when it comes to Scrabble. I am reminded of Marlon’s diatribe in WordFreak, where he implores people to make one of the several other bingos you can make with the letters in the word “niggers,” rather than playing that hateful word.

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~ by realsupergirl on February 12, 2008.

7 Responses to “Scrabble has no ethics”

  1. he implores people to make one of the several other bingos you can make with the letters in the word “niggers,” rather than playing that hateful word.

    Yeah, I get that, but what sort of other word were you going to make with the letters J-E-W? As far as I’m aware it’s not yet acceptable to spell “wedge” with a J.

  2. GINGERS and SNIGGER are the only two I see. Yeah, don’t think I could bring myself to play that bingo.

  3. Well, that one’s a gimme — gingers. What else are ya gonna do with “Jew?”

  4. Yeah, it surprised the heck out of me when Jew and Zen were not allowed by some programs. I usually have to find an “o” and play “jo” or “ow” or just let the turn pass. Have you ever played the variation where you get double points for dirty words or select an extra five points for the most elegant word in a full round? That is fun (IRL).

  5. No, I haven’t! But I’ve played sex scrabble (slang words usually not allowed are permitted, if they have to do with sex) as well as other themed scrabble games…

  6. Damn… I think I used jew recently… I didn’t even think about what it meant. I just saw it was acceptable (according to the dictionary on Facebook) and played it. Then, there are a lot of words I play without knowing what they mean. Not that ignorance is an excuse. I will refrain from using it.

  7. You know, the first time I heard “Jew” used as a verb was courtesy of my high school shop teacher. In class, even.

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